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3 juin 2017

Colour polymorphism is associated with lower extinction risk in birds [Globale Change Biology]

Christophe Thébaud & Lisa Jacquin

Colour polymorphisms have played a major role in enhancing current understanding of how selection and demography can impact phenotypes. Because different morphs often display alternative strategies and exploit alternative ecological niches, colour polymorphism can be expected to promote adaptability to environmental changes. However, whether and how it could influence populations’ and species’ response to global changes remains debated. To address this question, we built an up-to-date and complete database on avian colour polymorphism based on the examination of available data from all 10,394 extant bird species.(...)

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30 mai 2017

State of the World’s Plants 2017 [Royal Botanic Gardens - Kiew]

Guillaume Besnard (Page 36)

A detailed knowledge of plants is fundamental to human life on Earth. Plants underpin all aspects of our everyday life — from the food that we eat, to the clothes that we wear, the materials we use, the air we breathe, the medicines we take and much more. These essential services provided by plants are far too often taken for granted. This is the second annual report in which we have scrutinised databases, published literature, policy documents, reports and satellite imagery to provide a synthesis of current knowledge on the world’s plants.

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24 mai 2017

Confronting the risks of large-scale invasive species control [Nature Ecology & Evolution - Comment]

Julien Cucherousset

Large-scale invasive species control initiatives are motivated by laudable desires for native species recovery and economic benefits, but they are not without risk. Management interventions and policies should include evidence-based risk–benefit assessment and mitigation planning.

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24 mai 2017

[Offre de thèse financée] Effets de la variabilité génotypique et phénotypique des espèces invasives sur le fonctionnement des écosystèmes aquatiques

Les invasions biologiques sont une cause majeure d’érosion de la biodiversité qui affecte tous les niveaux d’organisation biologique. De récentes études ont démontré l’importance de la variabilité phénotypique et génotypique au sein des populations invasives. Néanmoins, il n’existe à peu d’étude ayant abordé les invasions biologiques de manière intégrative en utilisant une approche éco-évolutive allant du génotype à l’écosystème. Dans ce projet de thèse, nous proposons donc de déterminer le rôle relatif de l’environnement, du mode de colonisation et des pratiques de gestion sur la variabilité phénotypique et génotypique des espèces non-natives et de mesurer l’impact de cette variabilité individuelle sur le fonctionnement des écosystèmes.

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18 mai 2017

Did the first farmers deliberately domesticate wild plants ? [Evolution Letters Blogs]

Study with Benoît Pujol

A new study published in Evolution Letters, available now via Early View, has given us an interesting insight into the history of crop domestication. The work, by researchers at The University of Sheffield, UK, and the University of Toulouse, France, shows that seed enlargement probably evolved without the deliberate intention of early crop farmers. Humans have been artificially selecting for specific traits in domestic plants and animals for hundreds of years, selecting only the best individuals to breed and rejecting those with undesirable traits. However, this study shows that during the course of domestication, unintended changes have also occurred with dramatic effects.(...)

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