Supervisory authorities

CNRS

Our LABEX

Our Networks

Search




Visitors logged in: 7


Home > Communication > Scientific newsletter > Publications

Publications Publications feed

Page(s) : < | 1 | ... | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | ... | 164 |

16 March 2017

Transcriptome analysis of a wild bird reveals physiological responses to the urban environment [Scientific Reports]

Keywords : ecophysiology, evolutionary ecology

Identifying the molecular basis of environmentally induced phenotypic variation presents exciting opportunities for furthering our understanding of how ecological processes and the environment can shape the phenotype. Urban and rural environments present free-living organisms with different challenges and opportunities, which have marked consequences for the phenotype, yet little is known about responses at the molecular level. We characterised transcriptomes from an urban and a rural population of great tits Parus major, demonstrating striking differences in gene expression profiles in both blood and liver tissues.(...)

Read more

15 March 2017

Real-time divergent evolution in plants driven by pollinators [Nature]

Keywords : ecologie évolutive, evolution expérimentale, ecologie végétale, pollinisation

Pollinator-driven diversification is thought to be a major source of floral variation in plants. Our knowledge of this process is, however, limited to indirect assessments of evolutionary changes. Here, we employ experimental evolution with fast cycling Brassica rapa plants to demonstrate adaptive evolution driven by different pollinators. Our study shows pollinator-driven divergent selection as well as divergent evolution in plant traits. Plants pollinated by bumblebees evolved taller size and more fragrant flowers with increased ultraviolet reflection.(...)

Read more

15 March 2017

Antibiotic exposure perturbs the gut microbiota and elevates mortality in honeybees [PLOS Biology]

Keywords : bees, honey bees, tetracyclines, antibiotics, serratia, microbiome, opportunistic pathogens Gut bacteria

Gut microbiomes play crucial roles in animal health, and shifts in the gut microbial community structure can have detrimental impacts on hosts. Studies with vertebrate models and human subjects suggest that antibiotic treatments greatly perturb the native gut community, thereby facilitating proliferation of pathogens. In fact, persistent infections following antibiotic treatment are a major medical issue. In apiculture, antibiotics are frequently used to prevent bacterial infections of larval bees, but the impact of antibiotic-induced dysbiosis (microbial imbalance) on bee health and susceptibility to disease has not been fully elucidated. Here, we evaluated the effects of antibiotic exposure on the size and composition of honeybee gut communities.(...)

Read more

15 March 2017

Global determinants of zoogeographical boundaries [Nature Ecology & Evolution]

Keywords : biogeography, macroecology

The distribution of living organisms on Earth is spatially structured. Early biogeographers identified the existence of multiple zoogeographical regions, characterized by faunas with homogeneous composition that are separated by biogeographical boundaries. Yet, no study has deciphered the factors shaping the distributions of terrestrial biogeographical boundaries at the global scale. Here, using spatial regression analyses, we show that tectonic movements, sharp changes in climatic conditions and orographic barriers determine extant biogeographical boundaries.(...)

Read more

15 March 2017

Striving for transparent and credible research: practical guidelines for behavioral ecologists [Behavioral Ecology]

Isabel S Winney

Science is meant to be the systematic and objective study of the world but evidence suggests that scientific practices are sometimes falling short of this expectation. In this invited idea, we argue that any failure to conduct research according to a documented plan (lack of reliability) and/or any failure to ensure that reconducting the same project would provide the same finding (lack of reproducibility), will result in a low probability of independent studies reaching the same outcome (lack of replicability). After outlining the challenges facing behavioral ecology and science more broadly and incorporating advice from international organizations such as the Center for Open Science (COS), we present clear guidelines and tutorials on what we think open practices represent for behavioral ecologists.(...)

Read more

Page(s) : < | 1 | ... | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | ... | 164 |