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28 September 2017

The effect of rivers, streams, and canals on property values [River Research & Applications]

Keywords : aesthetic, canal, hedonic, property value, recreation, river, stream, view

Rivers, streams, and canals support a variety of critical agricultural, industrial, transportation, ecological, and household uses. They also provide important aesthetic, recreational, and sociocultural benefits. This review paper synthesizes the evidence to date regarding the value of these linear water features as aesthetic and recreational resources to adjacent and nearby residents. Specifically, it summarizes 25 studies that have used the hedonic pricing method to calculate the effects of views of and proximity to rivers, streams, and canals on surrounding residential property values. The majority of studies indicated that significant positive property price effects are associated with river, stream, and canal view and proximity, though these effects appear less definitive in rural than urban settings. Implications of the body of evidence for planning, management, and development are discussed, and potential effects of climate change and diversion policies are highlighted. Improvements in measurement facilitated by advanced geographic information systems and rigorous spatially explicit regression techniques are noted.

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28 September 2017

Ananke: temporal clustering reveals ecological dynamics of microbial communities [PeerJ]

Keywords : bioinformatics, ecology, microbiology, computational science

Taxonomic markers such as the 16S ribosomal RNA gene are widely used in microbial community analysis. A common first step in marker-gene analysis is grouping genes into clusters to reduce data sets to a more manageable size and potentially mitigate the effects of sequencing error. Instead of clustering based on sequence identity, marker-gene data sets collected over time can be clustered based on temporal correlation to reveal ecologically meaningful associations. We present Ananke, a free and open-source algorithm and software package that complements existing sequence-identity-based clustering approaches by clustering marker-gene data based on time-series profiles and provides interactive visualization of clusters, including highlighting of internal OTU inconsistencies. Ananke is able to cluster distinct temporal patterns from simulations of multiple ecological patterns, such as periodic seasonal dynamics and organism appearances/disappearances.(...)

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28 September 2017

Historical dynamics and current environmental effects explain the spatial distribution of species richness patterns of New World monkeys [PeerJ]

Keywords : biodiversity, biogeography

Why biodiversity is not uniformly distributed on the Earth is a major research question of biogeography. One of the most striking patterns of disparity in species distribution are the biodiversity hotspots, which generally do not fit with the distribution of relevant components of the Neotropical biota. In this study, we assess the proximal causes of the species-richness pattern of one of the most conspicuous groups of Neotropical mammals, the New World monkeys the Platyrrhini. We test two complementary hypotheses: (1) there is a historical source-sink dynamic (addressed using macroevolutionary and macroecological approaches); (2) the large number of species in the Amazon basin is due to the constraints imposed by environmental variables occurring outside this area.(...)

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28 September 2017

Competition induces increased toxin production in toad larvae without allelopathic effects on heterospecific tadpoles [Functional Ecology]

Keywords : allelopathy, amphibian toxins, chemical defence, chemical interference, growth-defence trade-off, growth inhibition, inducible defences, phenotypic plasticity

1.Inducible defences are a form of phenotypic plasticity by which organisms respond to and mitigate the threat posed by predators, parasites and competitors. While anti-predatory defences are often in trade-off with anti-competitor responses, chemicals that deter predators may have negative effects on competitors as well. Allelopathy is well known in plants and plant-like animals, but whether the toxins of mobile, behaviourally and morphologically complex animals are induced by and exert allelopathic effects on competitors is poorly known.
2. Common toads Bufo bufo synthesize bufadienolides which make them unpalatable or toxic to many predators. However, bufadienolide content of toad tadpoles correlates positively with the density of competitors in natural populations, suggesting that they may upregulate their toxin production to inhibit their competitors, such as heterospecific tadpoles that may be vulnerable to toad toxins.(...)

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27 September 2017

How to fight multiple enemies: target-specific chemical defences in an aposematic moth [Proceedings of the Royal Society B - Biological Sciences]

Keywords : predator–prey interactions, chemical defences, aposematism, pyrazines

Animals have evolved different defensive strategies to survive predation, among which chemical defences are particularly widespread and diverse. Here we investigate the function of chemical defence diversity, hypothesizing that such diversity has evolved as a response to multiple enemies. The aposematic wood tiger moth (Arctia plantaginis) displays conspicuous hindwing coloration and secretes distinct defensive fluids from its thoracic glands and abdomen. We presented the two defensive fluids from laboratory-reared moths to two biologically relevant predators, birds and ants, and measured their reaction in controlled bioassays (no information on colour was provided). We found that defensive fluids are target-specific: thoracic fluids, and particularly 2-sec-butyl-3-methoxypyrazine, which they contain, deterred birds, but caused no aversive response in ants. By contrast, abdominal fluids were particularly deterrent to ants, while birds did not find them repellent. Our study, to our knowledge, is the first to show evidence of a single species producing separate chemical defences targeted to different predator types, highlighting the importance of taking into account complex predator communities in studies on the evolution of prey defence diversity.

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