Supervisory authorities

CNRS

Our LABEX

Our Networks

Search




Visitors logged in: 4


Home > Communication > Scientific newsletter > Publications

Publications Publications feed

Page(s) : < | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | ... | 118 |

23 November 2016

Artificial selection on male genitalia length alters female brain size [Royal Society Open Science]

Keywords : sexual conflict, sexual dimorphism, brain evolution, male harassment, gonopodium, Gambusia holbrooki

Male harassment is a classic example of how sexual conflict over mating leads to sex-specific behavioural adaptations. Females often suffer significant costs from males attempting forced copulations, and the sexes can be in an arms race over male coercion. Yet, despite recent recognition that divergent sex-specific interests in reproduction can affect brain evolution, sexual conflict has not been addressed in this context. Here, we investigate whether artificial selection on a correlate of male success at coercion, genital length, affects brain anatomy in males and females. We analysed the brains of eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki), which had been artificially selected for long or short gonopodium, thereby mimicking selection arising from differing levels of male harassment.(...)

Read more

23 November 2016

Habitat specialization explains avian persistence in tidal marshes [Ecosphere]

Keywords : climate change, niche, specialism, species conservation, tidal marsh

Habitat specialists are declining at alarming rates worldwide, driving biodiversity loss of the earth’s next mass extinction. Specialist organisms maintain smaller functional niches than their generalist counterparts, and tradeoffs exist between these contrasting life history strategies, creating conservation challenges for specialist taxa. There is little work, however, explicitly quantifying “specialization”; such information is necessary for the development of focused conservation strategies in light of the rapidly changing landscapes of the modern world. In this study, we tested whether habitat specialism explains the persistence of breeding bird populations in tidal marshes of the northeastern United States. We used the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) together with contemporary marsh bird surveys to develop a Marsh Specialization Index (MSI) for 106 bird species that regularly use tidal marshes during the breeding season.(...)

Read more

21 November 2016

Evolution alters the consequences of invasions in experimental communities [Nature Ecology & Evolution]

Keywords : experimental evolution, invasive species

Evolution has the capacity to alter the course of biological invasions, although such changes remain mostly unexplored by experiments. Integrating evolution into studies of invasions is important, because species traits can potentially evolve in ways that either moderate or exacerbate the impacts of invasions. We have assessed whether species evolved during experimental invasions by comparing the performance of founder populations and their potentially evolved descendants in communities of ciliates and rotifers.(...)

Read more

19 November 2016

Phylosymbiosis: Relationships and Functional Effects of Microbial Communities across Host Evolutionary History [PLOS Biology]

Subject Areas : microbiome, peromyscus, microbial evolution, Drosophila melanogaster, animal phylogenetics, mosquitoes, insects, phylogenetic analysis

Phylosymbiosis was recently proposed to describe the eco-evolutionary pattern, whereby the ecological relatedness of host-associated microbial communities parallels the phylogeny of related host species. Here, we test the prevalence of phylosymbiosis and its functional significance under highly controlled conditions by characterizing the microbiota of 24 animal species from four different groups (Peromyscus deer mice, Drosophila flies, mosquitoes, and Nasonia wasps), and we reevaluate the phylosymbiotic relationships of seven species of wild hominids. We demonstrate three key findings.(...)

Read more

19 November 2016

Shaking up the Tree of Life [Science/Feature]

Species were once thought to keep to themselves. Now, hybrids are turning up everywhere, challenging evolutionary theory.

In 2010 a comparison between a Neandertal genome and genomes from people today turned up evidence of ancient liaisons, a discovery that belied the common idea that animal species can’t hybridize or, if they do, will produce infertile offspring—think mules. Such reproductive isolation is part of the classic definition of a species. This discovery brought credence to other work in plants, Darwin’s finches in the Galápagos Islands, tropical butterflies, mosquitoes, and a few other animals showing that hybridization was not just common, but also important in shaping evolution. The techniques that revealed the Neandertal and Denisovan legacy in our own genome are now making it possible to peer into the genomic histories of many organisms to check for interbreeding. As more examples are discovered, researchers are questioning the definition of species and rethinking whether the tree of life is really a "net" of life.

Read more

Page(s) : < | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | ... | 118 |