Supervisory authorities

CNRS

Our LABEX

Our Networks

Search




Visitors logged in: 10


Home > Communication > Scientific newsletter > Publications

Publications Publications feed

Page(s) : < | 1 | ... | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | ... | 126 |

4 January 2017

Damming Fragments Species Ranges and Heightens Extinction Risk [Conservation Letters]

Stephanie R. Januchowski-Hartley, Céline Jézéquel, Pablo A. Tedesco

Tropical rivers are experiencing an unprecedented boom in dam construction. Despite rapid dam expansion, knowledge about the ecology of tropical rivers and the implications of existing and planned dams on freshwater-dependent species remains limited. Here we evaluate fragmentation of fish species ranges, considering current and planned dams of the Magdalena River basin, Colombia. We quantify the relationship between species range and body size and use a vulnerability limit set by this relationship to explore the influence that fragmentation of species ranges has on extinction risk. We find that both existing and planned dams fragment most fish species ranges splitting, them into more vulnerable populations. Importantly, we find that migratory species, and those that support fisheries, are most affected by fragmentation. Our results highlight the dramatic impact that dams can have on freshwater fishes and offer insights into species extinction risk for data-limited regions.

Read more

20 December 2016

Global loss of avian evolutionary uniqueness in urban areas [Global Change Biology]

Keywords : biodiversity, biotic homogenization, birds, evolutionary distinctiveness, human-induced environmental change, urban ecology

Urbanization, one of the most important anthropogenic impacts on Earth, is rapidly expanding worldwide. This expansion of urban land-covered areas is known to significantly reduce different components of biodiversity. However, the global evidence for this effect is mainly focused on a single diversity measure (species richness) with a few local or regional studies also supporting reductions in functional diversity. We have used birds, an important ecological group that has been used as surrogate for other animals, to investigate the hypothesis that urbanization reduces the global taxonomical and/or evolutionary diversity. We have also explored whether there is evidence supporting that urban bird communities are evolutionarily homogenized worldwide in comparison with nonurban ones by means of using evolutionary distinctiveness (how unique are the species) of bird communities.(...)

Read more

20 December 2016

Investigating uncertainties in zooplankton composition shifts under climate change scenarios in the Mediterranean Sea [Ecography]

Ensemble niche modelling has become a common framework to predict changes in assemblages composition under climate change scenarios. The amount of uncertainty generated by the different components of this framework has rarely been assessed. In the marine realm forecasts have usually focused on taxa representing the top of the marine food-web, thus overlooking their basal component: the plankton. Calibrating environmental niche models at the global scale, we modelled the habitat suitability of 106 copepod species and estimated the dissimilarity between present and future zooplanktonic assemblages in the surface Mediterranean Sea.(...)

Read more

20 December 2016

Global leaf trait estimates biased due to plasticity in the shade [Nature Plants]

Keywords : ecophysiology, ecosystem ecology, plant physiology

The study of leaf functional trait relationships, the so-called leaf economics spectrum is based on the assumption of high-light conditions (as experienced by sunlit leaves). Owing to the exponential decrease of light availability through canopies, however, the vast majority of the world’s vegetation exists in at least partial shade. Plant functional traits vary in direct dependence of light availability, with different traits varying to different degrees, sometimes in conflict with expectations from the economic spectrum.(...)

Read more

20 December 2016

Relic DNA is abundant in soil and obscures estimates of soil microbial diversity [Nature Microbiology]

Keywords : biogeochemistry, microbial ecology

Extracellular DNA from dead microorganisms can persist in soil for weeks to years. Although it is implicitly assumed that the microbial DNA recovered from soil predominantly represents intact cells, it is unclear how extracellular DNA affects molecular analyses of microbial diversity. We examined a wide range of soils using viability PCR based on the photoreactive DNA-intercalating dye propidium monoazide.(...)

Read more

Page(s) : < | 1 | ... | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | ... | 126 |