Supervisory authorities

CNRS

Our LABEX

Our Networks

Search




Visitors logged in: 0


Home > Communication > Scientific newsletter > Publications

Publications Publications feed

Page(s) : < | 1 | ... | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | ... | 136 |

1 February 2017

Effects of amphibian phylogeny, climate and human impact on the occurrence of the amphibian-killing chytrid fungus [Global Change Biology]

Keywords : amphibian population declines, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Chile, chytrid fungus, chytridiomycosis, emerging infectious diseases

Chytridiomycosis, due to the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has been associated with the alarming decline and extinction crisis of amphibians worldwide. Because conservation programs are implemented locally, it is essential to understand how the complex interactions among host species, climate and human activities contribute to Bd occurrence at regional scales. Using weighted phylogenetic regressions and model selection, we investigated geographic patterns of Bd occurrence along a latitudinal gradient of 1500 km within a biodiversity hot spot in Chile (1845 individuals sampled from 253 sites and representing 24 species), and its association with climatic, socio-demographic and economic variables.(...)

Read more

1 February 2017

Infection reduces anti-predator behaviors in house finches [Journal of Avian Biology]

Infectious diseases can cause host mortality through direct or indirect mechanisms, including altered behavior. Diminished anti-predator behavior is among the most-studied causes of indirect mortality during infection, particularly for systems in which a parasite’s life-cycle requires transmission from prey to predator. Significantly less work has examined whether directly-transmitted parasites and pathogens also reduce anti-predator behaviors. Here we test whether the directly-transmitted bacterial pathogen, Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), reduces responses to predation-related stimuli in house finches Haemorhous mexicanus.(...)

Read more

1 February 2017

The Repeated Evolution of Behavior [Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution]

A major tool in the evolutionary biologist’s kit is to study the repeated emergence of certain biological traits. Employment of this tool has allowed substantial recent advances to be made in understanding the adaptive molecular basis of certain key biological traits. However, behavior, one life’s most pervasive, and complex traits, is not one. Here we review the concepts of repeated evolution and how they apply to behavior. We assess the distribution and evolutionary dynamics of known cases of repeated behavioral evolution and examine their prospects for success in identifying the genetic and mechanistic bases of behavior. We propose that studying adaptive radiations, such as that seen amongst the cichlids of Lake Malawi, will likely yield results quickly due to the tractability of genetic and comparative analyses(...)

Read more

31 January 2017

Convergent recombination suppression suggests role of sexual selection in guppy sex chromosome formation [Nature Communications]

Keywords : evolutionary genetics, genetic variation, sexual selection

Sex chromosomes evolve once recombination is halted between a homologous pair of chromosomes. The dominant model of sex chromosome evolution posits that recombination is suppressed between emerging X and Y chromosomes in order to resolve sexual conflict. Here we test this model using whole genome and transcriptome resequencing data in the guppy, a model for sexual selection with many Y-linked colour traits.(...)

Read more

31 January 2017

Setting temporal baselines for biodiversity: the limits of available monitoring data for capturing the full impact of anthropogenic pressures [Scientific Reports]

Keywords : conservation biology, ecology

Temporal baselines are needed for biodiversity, in order for the change in biodiversity to be measured over time, the targets for biodiversity conservation to be defined and conservation progress to be evaluated. Limited biodiversity information is widely recognized as a major barrier for identifying temporal baselines, although a comprehensive quantitative assessment of this is lacking. Here, we report on the temporal baselines that could be drawn from biodiversity monitoring schemes in Europe and compare those with the rise of important anthropogenic pressures. Most biodiversity monitoring schemes were initiated late in the 20th century, well after anthropogenic pressures had already reached half of their current magnitude.(...)

Read more

Page(s) : < | 1 | ... | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | ... | 136 |