Supervisory authorities

CNRS

Our LABEX

Our Networks

Search




Visitors logged in: 2


Home > Communication > Scientific newsletter > Publications

Publications Publications feed

Page(s) : < | 1 | ... | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | ... | 118 |

27 October 2016

Plant-mycorrhizal interactions mediate plant community coexistence by altering resource demand [Ecology]

Keywords : coexistence, mycorrhizae, resource ratio theory, resource competition, soil, plant-soil feedback, R* model

As the diversity of plants increases in an ecosystem, so does resource competition for soil nutrients, a process that mycorrhizal fungi can mediate. The influence of mycorrhizal fungi on plant biodiversity likely depends on the strength of the symbiosis between the plant and fungi, the differential plant growth responses to mycorrhizal inoculation, and the transfer rate of nutrients from the fungus to plant. However, our current understanding of how nutrient-plant-mycorrhizal interactions influence plant coexistence is conceptual and thus lacks a unified quantitative framework.(...)

Read more

27 October 2016

Elemental characterisation of melanin in feathers via synchrotron X-ray imaging and absorption spectroscopy [Scientific Reports]

Keywords : analytical chemistry, biochemistry

Melanin is a critical component of biological systems, but the exact chemistry of melanin is still imprecisely known. This is partly due to melanin’s complex heterogeneous nature and partly because many studies use synthetic analogues and/or pigments extracted from their natural biological setting, which may display important differences from endogenous pigments. Here we demonstrate how synchrotron X-ray analyses can non-destructively characterise the elements associated with melanin pigment in situ within extant feathers. Elemental imaging shows that the distributions of Ca, Cu and Zn are almost exclusively controlled by melanin pigment distribution.(...)

Read more

25 October 2016

Thousands of microbial genomes shed light on interconnected biogeochemical processes in an aquifer system [Nature communications]

Keywords : element cycles, metagenomics, microbial ecology

The subterranean world hosts up to one-fifth of all biomass, including microbial communities that drive transformations central to Earth’s biogeochemical cycles. However, little is known about how complex microbial communities in such environments are structured, and how inter-organism interactions shape ecosystem function. Here we apply terabase-scale cultivation-independent metagenomics to aquifer sediments and groundwater, and reconstruct 2,540 draft-quality, near-complete and complete strain-resolved genomes that represent the majority of known bacterial phyla as well as 47 newly discovered phylum-level lineages.(...)

Read more

24 October 2016

Climate forcing of an emerging pathogenic fungus across a montane multi-host community [Royal Society Open Science]

Keywords : climate change, chytridiomycosis, multi-host communities, epidemiology, mountain ecosystems, host × pathogen ×, environment interaction

Changes in the timings of seasonality as a result of anthropogenic climate change are predicted to occur over the coming decades. While this is expected to have widespread impacts on the dynamics of infectious disease through environmental forcing, empirical data are lacking. Here, we investigated whether seasonality, specifically the timing of spring ice-thaw, affected susceptibility to infection by the emerging pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) across a montane community of amphibians that are suffering declines and extirpations as a consequence of this infection. We found a robust temporal association between the timing of the spring thaw and Bd infection in two host species, where we show that an early onset of spring forced high prevalences of infection.(...)

Read more

24 October 2016

Mitigating amphibian chytridiomycoses in nature [Royal Society Open Science]

Keywords : chytridiomycosis, mitigation, conservation strategy

Amphibians across the planet face the threat of population decline and extirpation caused by the disease chytridiomycosis. Despite consensus that the fungal pathogens responsible for the disease are conservation issues, strategies to mitigate their impacts in the natural world are, at best, nascent. Reducing risk associated with the movement of amphibians, non-amphibian vectors and other sources of infection remains the first line of defence and a primary objective when mitigating the threat of disease in wildlife. Amphibian-associated chytridiomycete fungi and chytridiomycosis are already widespread, though, and we therefore focus on discussing options for mitigating the threats once disease emergence has occurred in wild amphibian populations. (...)

Read more

Page(s) : < | 1 | ... | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | ... | 118 |