Supervisory authorities

CNRS

Our LABEX

Our Networks

Search




Visitors logged in: 13


Home > Communication > Scientific newsletter > Publications

Publications Publications feed

Page(s) : < | 1 | ... | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | ... | 175 |

16 May 2017

From effective biocontrol agent to successful invader: the harlequin ladybird (Harmonia axyridis) as an example of good ideas that could go wrong [PeerJ]

Keywords : biodiversity, conservation biology, ecology, entomology, environmental sciences

The use of biological control agents to control pests is an alternative to pesticides and a tool to manage invasive alien species. However, biocontrol agents can themselves become invasive species under certain conditions. The harlequin ladybird (Harmonia axyridis) is a native Asian biocontrol agent that has become a successful invader. We reviewed articles containing “Harmonia axyridis” to gather information on its presence and surveyed entomologists researching Coccinellidae around the world to investigate further insights about the current distribution, vectors of introduction, habitat use and threats this species pose.(...)

Read more

16 May 2017

Perceptive costs of reproduction drive ageing and physiology in male Drosophila [Nature Ecology & Evolution]

Keywords : evolutionary theory, neuroscience, social evolution

Costs of reproduction are thought to result from natural selection optimizing organismal fitness within putative physiological constraints. Phenotypic and population genetic studies of reproductive costs are plentiful across taxa, but an understanding of their mechanistic basis would provide important insight into the diversity in life-history traits, including reproductive effort and ageing. Here, we dissect the causes and consequences of specific costs of reproduction in male Drosophila melanogaster.(...)

Read more

16 May 2017

Beyond nutrients: A meta-analysis of the diverse effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on plants and soils [Ecology]

Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhizas, mutualism-parasitism continuum, soil aggregation, disease resistance, plant defense, plant chemical defense, allelochemical transport, allelochemical protection, water uptake, nutrient uptake, meta-analysis

Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can increase plant fitness under certain environmental conditions. Among the mechanisms that may drive this mutualism, the most studied is provisioning of nutrients by AMF in exchange for carbon from plant hosts. However, AMF may also provide a suite of non-nutritional benefits to plants including improved water uptake, disease resistance, plant chemical defense, soil aggregation, and allelochemical transport and protection. Here, we use a meta-analysis of 93 studies to assess the relative effect of AMF on nutritional and non-nutritional factors that may influence plant fitness.(...)

Read more

16 May 2017

The Degree of Urbanization of a Species Affects How Intensively It Is Studied: A Global Perspective [Frontiers in Ecology & Evolution]

The expansion of urban areas is currently one of the most important worldwide landscape changes. This process, termed urbanization, has important ecological effects and is known to alter many aspects of the biology of organisms (including birds). However, human-nature interactions can also be affected by this process. We hypothesized that urbanization can particularly affect how intensively we investigate birds. We predict that species living in close proximity to humans will be more easily or preferably studied, thus promoting a bias in research effort toward urban birds. In order to test this hypothesis we have collected a detailed database of urban and non-urban avian communities including information from five biogeographic realms and more than 750 bird species.(...)

Read more

15 May 2017

Increasing phenological asynchrony between spring green-up and arrival of migratory birds [Scientific Reports]

Keywords : animal migration, community ecology, environmental health, macroecology, phenology

Consistent with a warming climate, birds are shifting the timing of their migrations, but it remains unclear to what extent these shifts have kept pace with the changing environment. Because bird migration is primarily cued by annually consistent physiological responses to photoperiod, but conditions at their breeding grounds depend on annually variable climate, bird arrival and climate-driven spring events would diverge. We combined satellite and citizen science data to estimate rates of change in phenological interval between spring green-up and migratory arrival for 48 breeding passerine species across North America.(...)

Read more

Page(s) : < | 1 | ... | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | ... | 175 |