Supervisory authorities

CNRS

Our LABEX

Our Networks

Search




Visitors logged in: 5


Home > Communication > Scientific newsletter > Publications

Publications Publications feed

Page(s) : < | 1 | ... | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | ... | 207 |

3 October 2017

Nectar-inhabiting microorganisms influence nectar volatile composition and attractiveness to a generalist pollinator [New Phytologist]

Keywords : Apis mellifera, floral headspace, microbial volatile (MVOC), nectar microbes, pollination, semiochemical; volatile organic chemicals (VOCs), yeast

The plant microbiome can influence plant phenotype in diverse ways, yet microbial contribution to plant volatile phenotype remains poorly understood. We examine the presence of fungi and bacteria in the nectar of a coflowering plant community, characterize the volatiles produced by common nectar microbes and examine their influence on pollinator preference.(...)

Read more

3 October 2017

Tropical forests are a net carbon source based on aboveground measurements of gain and loss [Science]

The carbon balance of tropical ecosystems remains uncertain, with top-down atmospheric studies suggesting an overall sink and bottom-up ecological approaches indicating a modest net source. Here we use 12 years (2003–2014) of MODIS pantropical satellite data to quantify net annual changes in the aboveground carbon density of tropical woody live vegetation, providing direct, measurement-based evidence that the world’s tropical forests are a net carbon source of 425.2 ± 92.0 Tg C yr –1. This net release of carbon consists of losses of 861.7 ± 80.2 Tg C yr –1 and gains of 436.5 ± 31.0 Tg C yr –1. Gains result from forest growth; losses result from deforestation and from reductions in carbon density within standing forests (degradation/disturbance), with the latter accounting for 68.9% of overall losses.

Read more

3 October 2017

Phenotypic plasticity in the morphology of small benthic Icelandic Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) [Ecology of Freshwater Fish]

Keywords : adaptation, biodiversity, ecological factors, evolutionary ecology, groundwater, Iceland

Intraspecific phenotypic diversity is the raw material for evolution, so understanding its origin and maintenance is critically important for conservation of biodiversity. Intraspecific diversity in a trait or a suite of traits can result from genetic diversity and/or phenotypic plasticity. The two are, however, not independent as plasticity has been shown to evolve. In this study, we evaluated the importance of phenotypic plasticity in generating morphological diversity in populations of small benthic Arctic charr in Iceland, using a rearing experiment with contrasting modes of feeding.(...)

Read more

3 October 2017

Ex situ conservation of plant diversity in the world’s botanic gardens [Nature Plants]

Keywords : biodiversity, conservation biology, plant evolution

Botanic gardens conserve plant diversity ex situ and can prevent extinction through integrated conservation action. Here we quantify how that diversity is conserved in ex situ collections across the world’s botanic gardens. We reveal that botanic gardens manage at least 105,634 species, equating to 30% of all plant species diversity, and conserve over 41% of known threatened species. However, we also reveal that botanic gardens are disproportionately temperate, with 93% of species held in the Northern Hemisphere. Consequently, an estimated 76% of species absent from living collections are tropical in origin. Furthermore, phylogenetic bias ensures that over 50% of vascular genera, but barely 5% of non-vascular genera, are conserved ex situ. While botanic gardens are discernibly responding to the threat of species extinction, just 10% of network capacity is devoted to threatened species. We conclude that botanic gardens play a fundamental role in plant conservation, but identify actions to enhance future conservation of biodiversity.

Read more

28 September 2017

Asymmetry hidden in birds’ tracks reveals wind, heading, and orientation ability over the ocean [Science Advances]

Numerous flying and swimming animals constantly need to control their heading (that is, their direction of orientation) in a flow to reach their distant destination. However, animal orientation in a flow has yet to be satisfactorily explained because it is difficult to directly measure animal heading and flow. We constructed a new animal movement model based on the asymmetric distribution of the GPS (Global Positioning System) track vector along its mean vector, which might be caused by wind flow. This statistical model enabled us to simultaneously estimate animal heading (navigational decision-making) and ocean wind information over the range traversed by free-ranging birds. We applied this method to the tracking data of homing seabirds.(...)

Read more

Page(s) : < | 1 | ... | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | ... | 207 |