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Home > Communication > Scientific newsletter > Press articles > Sciences

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3 December 2016

Une sauterelle épineuse australienne faire fuir un oiseau grâce à ses pattes [Ornithomedia]

Pour la première fois, des entomologistes australiens ont observé un orthoptère du genre Phricta frapper un oiseau avec ses pattes.

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3 December 2016

Bees of the sea: Tiny crustaceans pollinate underwater plants [New Scientist]

Seagrass pollen swirls around on currents and tides, but it turns out that the grains can also hitch a ride on tiny marine creatures. Underwater invertebrates can ferry pollen between flowers, in the same way that bees and other animals pollinate plants on land.

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3 December 2016

Researchers may have found first polluted river from before Bronze Age [Phys]

Industrial pollution may seem like a modern phenomenon, but in fact, an international team of researchers may have discovered what could be the world’s first polluted river, contaminated approximately 7,000 years ago.

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3 December 2016

Déforestation en Amazonie : + 29 % en un an [Futura-Sciences]

Pour la deuxième année consécutive, la forêt amazonienne au Brésil a connu un accroissement de la déforestation. En 2016, celle-ci a augmenté de 29 % par rapport à l’année précédente, laquelle avait déjà enregistré une forte hausse. Plusieurs associations écologistes dénoncent la baisse d’implication du gouvernement brésilien, qui a réduit de 30 % en 2016 le budget de l’Ibama, l’institut chargé de lutter contre les actions illégales.

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1 December 2016

Human ancestor ’Lucy’ was a tree climber, new evidence suggests [Phys]

Since the discovery of the fossil dubbed Lucy 42 years ago this month, paleontologists have debated whether the 3 million-year-old human ancestor spent all of her time walking on the ground or instead combined walking with frequent tree climbing. Now, analysis of special CT scans by scientists from The Johns Hopkins University and the University of Texas at Austin suggests the female hominin spent enough time in the trees that evidence of this behavior is preserved in the internal structure of her bones. A description of the research study appears November 30 in the journal PLOS ONE.

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