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Home > Communication > Scientific newsletter > Press articles > Science

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24 January 2017

Les dinosaures sont morts de froid [Le Monde - Blogs]

De quoi, donc, sont exactement morts les dinosaures ? Pour répondre à la question, une équipe allemande du Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research vient de publier, dans les Geophysical Research Letters (GRL), une étude où elle explique avoir pour la première fois couplé la collision avec l’astéroïde à un modèle de simulation du climat.

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20 January 2017

Humans, not climate change, wiped out Australian megafauna [Phys]

New evidence involving the ancient poop of some of the huge and astonishing creatures that once roamed Australia indicates the primary cause of their extinction around 45,000 years ago was likely a result of humans, not climate change.

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20 January 2017

The astonishing science behind the desert’s mysterious fairy circles [The Washington Post]

“This is a classic thing in ecology where debates will emerge and go on for decades,” said Rob Pringle, an ecologist at Princeton University. “And the resolution after all that time is usually, ’Well, it’s a little bit of both.’ ”
That’s the conclusion of a new paper Pringle and his colleagues published Wednesday in the journal Nature.(...)

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20 January 2017

Foxes may confuse predators by rubbing themselves in puma scent [New Scientist]

They have a reputation as cunning creatures, and some foxes appear to be living up to it as masters of disguise.
Gray foxes living in the mountains of California have been filmed deliberately rubbing themselves in the scent marks left by mountain lions.
They may be using the scent of the big cats, also known as pumas or cougars, as a sort of odour camouflage against other large predators such as coyotes.(...)

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19 January 2017

Les singes pourraient disparaître d’ici vingt-cinq ans à cinquante ans [Le Monde - Biodiversité]

Selon une étude, 60 % des espèces de primates sont en danger d’extinction en raison d’activités humaines. 75 % des populations accusent déjà un déclin.

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