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Home > Communication > Scientific newsletter > Press articles > Science

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26 September 2017

Panda habitat shrinking, becoming more fragmented [Phys]

The study, published Sept. 25 in the peer-reviewed journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, used geospatial technologies and remote sensing data to map recent land-use changes and the development of roads within the panda’s habitat.

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22 September 2017

Meet ‘Jaws’, the South American horned frog with a big bite [The Conversation]

South American horned frogs (Ceratophrys) can capture and swallow whole animals up to their own body size, including other frogs, lizards, snakes and rodents. This is possible because they have jaws that can produce an extremely forceful bite.

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22 September 2017

Even jellyfish get sluggish if they don’t have enough sleep [New Scientist]

Birds do it, bees do it, even enervated fleas do it. Sleep is widely believed to be common to all animals with a central nervous system, but it turns out to be even more ubiquitous than that.
Jellyfish have been found to enter a sleep-like state at night, and become dozy the next day if their rest is interrupted. This is remarkable for an animal with a simple, diffuse nervous system and no centralised brain.

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22 September 2017

Important déclin du Moineau domestique à Paris [CORIF - LPO]

Depuis 2003, le Centre ornithologique Île-de-France et la LPO Île-de-France étudient l’évolution de la population de moineaux domestique à Paris.
Quatorze vagues d’observations sur près de 200 points montrent que trois moineaux sur quatre ont disparu du paysage parisien en treize ans.
Avec un retard d’une bonne décennie, les moineaux parisiens subissent le même sort que leurs congénères des autres grandes villes européennes.

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22 September 2017

Scientists discover unique Brazilian frogs that are deaf to their own mating calls [The Guardian]

Pumpkin toadlet frogs are only known case of an animal that continues to make a communication signal even after the target audience has lost the ability to hear it.

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