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Home > Communication > Scientific newsletter > Press articles > Sciences

Sciences Sciences feed

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8 March 2016

Mite-virus alliance could be bringing down honeybees [ScienceNews]

The parasitic mite Varroa destructor feasts on bees of all ages and reproduces on pupae. As the mite travels through bee colonies, it can spread deformed wing virus, which can cause crippled wings and death in extreme cases. By suppressing a bee’s immunity, the virus may improve a mite’s ability to feed and breed on baby bees, researchers in Italy report March 7 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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8 March 2016

La violence chez les mangoustes rayées, un mal pour un bien ? [Sciences et Avenir - Animaux]

Souvent paisibles, les mangoustes rayées peuvent se révéler très violentes lors de la reproduction. Résultat : un brassage génétique optimal.

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8 March 2016

Even plant-supporting soil fungi affected by global warming, study finds [Phys]

On a cool, fog-shrouded mountain of Costa Rica, University of California, Irvine biologist Caitlin Looby is finding that warming temperatures are becoming an increasing problem for one of the most ecologically diverse places on Earth.
Seeking to determine how shifts in the tropical mountain cloud forest ecosystem would affect resident fungal species in Monteverde, Looby and fellow ecology & evolutionary biology graduate student Mia Maltz and their adviser, Kathleen Treseder, found that as the moist mountain soil dries out due to a warming climate, the fungi infrastructure that supports the abundant plant life also will change.

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8 March 2016

Zombifiés par un champignon, des grenouilles se transforment en funestes don Juan [Sciences et Avenir - Animaux]

Un champignon parasite des amphibiens favorise sa dispersion en modifiant les appels d’accouplement de ses victimes.

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7 March 2016

Missing genes not always a problem for people [ScienceNews]

Many genes may be dispensable.
Each of 3,222 British people with Pakistani heritage carries, on average, mutations in 140 genes that stop those genes from working, researchers report online March 3 in Science. Examination of those people’s exomes, the small portion of the genome that encodes proteins, revealed that among a subset of 821 participants, a total of 781 genes were rendered obsolete by “loss-of-function” mutations. Those genes include 422 that scientists didn’t know people could live without and still be healthy.

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