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Home > Communication > Scientific newsletter > Press articles > Sciences

Sciences Sciences feed

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2 February 2017

Les araignées bariolées voient les couleurs [Sciences et Avenir - Animaux]

Selon une étude présentée en janvier 2017, les araignées du genre Habronattus et Maratus sont sensibles a bien plus de couleurs que ce que pensaient précédemment les chercheurs.

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2 February 2017

Plant keeps moths captive inside its fruits for almost a year [New Scientist]

Zoologger is our weekly column highlighting extraordinary animals – and occasionally other organisms – from around the world.

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2 February 2017

The seeds of speciation [The Molecular Ecologist]

You don’t have to get very far into an evolution textbook before you bump into Darwin’s finches, the birds descended from South American finches that colonized the Galapagos Islands and “radiated” into an array of different species, each with a beak adapted to different food sources across the archipelago. Another, equally interesting case of avian adaptation is found in North America, on a different sort of archipelago. It’s found in patches of lodgepole pine forest that cloak the slopes and foothills of the Rocky Mountains, in the hooked beaks of red crossbills.

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2 February 2017

Les canyons sous-marins, des écosystèmes fortement menacés par les activités humaines [Ifremer]

Publié le 31 janvier 2017 dans la revue Frontiers in Marine Science, une étude menée par des chercheurs du Réseau international pour l’étude et l’échange scientifique sur les canyons sous-marins (INCISE) met en évidence l’importance écologique des canyons et la nécessité de mieux protéger ces espaces sensibles aux activités humaines. L’Ifremer a contribué à ces travaux en apportant notamment des informations sur les coraux du golfe de Gascogne.

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2 February 2017

Ant choosiness reveals they all have different personalities [New Scientist]

The power to imagine a better world has helped transform human societies, and it seems it may be doing so on a smaller scale to ant societies, too.
Individual ants have now been shown to have differences in behaviour − something almost akin to having a personality − that affect colony decisions. And some ants are so different in their personal preferences that they may act as the imagination of the colony, driving it on to a better future.

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