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Home > Communication > Scientific newsletter > Press articles > Science

Science Science feed

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12 April 2016

Tropical birds develop ’superfast’ wing muscles for mating, not flying [Phys]

Studies in a group of tropical birds have revealed one of the fastest limb muscles on record for any animal with a backbone. The muscle, which can move the wing at more than twice the speeds required for flying, has evolved in association with extravagant courtship displays that involve rapid limb movements, according to a paper to be published in the journal eLife.

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12 April 2016

Trois pesticides communs seraient dangereux pour 97% des espèces menacées [Sciences et Avenir - Animaux]

Alors que l’interdiction des néonicotinoïdes en France a été passée dans la loi Biodiversité, un nouveau rapport américain soulève la dangerosité pour la vie sauvage de trois pesticides non-néonicotinoïdes.

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11 April 2016

Des vidéos enregistrées... sur de l’ADN [Futura-sciences]

Enregistrer un livre entier dans des molécules d’ADN, c’est fait depuis un certain temps. Des chercheurs sont allés un cran plus loin avec des images et des vidéos. La densité du stockage et la durabilité des mémoires à base d’ADN surpassant celle de nos disques durs et autre mémoire flash, elles devraient se développer dans un futur pas trop lointain.

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11 April 2016

A heated mirror for future climate [Science]

Climate has always changed naturally, and this is not good news when contemplating a human-forced future. The natural responses have been as large as, or larger than, those simulated by leading models for shorter time scales, with major biological and physical impacts. The possible effects of rapid carbon dioxide (CO2) release may be clearest from the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) about 55.9 million years ago, when a large, natural CO2 release drove strong warming that caused amplifying feedbacks, dwarfing of large animals, ecosystem disruptions, soil degradation, water-cycle shifts, and other major changes (see the figure). The climatic changes during the PETM occurred over longer time scales than those of anthropogenic climate change. The impacts of the latter may thus be even more severe.

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8 April 2016

Microbes take center stage in workings of ’the river’s liver’ [Phys]

When water levels in rivers rise, an area known as the "river’s liver" kicks into action, cleansing river water of pollutants and altering the flow of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.
Now, in a paper published April 7 in Nature Communications, scientists at the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory present evidence suggesting that rising river waters deliver a feast of carbon to hungry microbes where water meets land, triggering increased activity, which could naturally boost emissions of carbon dioxide, methane and other greenhouse gases.

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