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27 February 2017

Study reveals ways powerful ’master gene’ regulates physical differences between sexes [Phys]

Physical differences between males and females in species are common, but there remains much to learn about the genetic mechanisms behind these differences.
New research by scientists at Indiana University finds that the "master gene" that regulates these differences plays a complex role in matching the right physical trait to the right sex. The study, published Feb. 27 in the journal Nature Communications, reveals new details about the behavior of the gene called "doublesex," or dsx.

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27 February 2017

Quand le gouvernement et la FNSEA redessinent la carte des cours d’eau 1/2 [Reporterre]

La loi sur l’eau de 2006 vise à retrouver un « bon état » écologique des masses d’eau douce. Mais discrètement, pour complaire à la FNSEA, le gouvernement a entrepris de soustraire une partie des cours d’eau à l’application de la loi. Premier volet de la grande enquête de Reporterre.

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23 February 2017

Australian termites followed similar evolutionary path to humans, study finds [The Guardian]

DNA sequencing shows insects crossed oceans then migrated from treetops to the ground to adapt to ancient climate change.

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23 February 2017

Comment une fourmi africaine pourrait aider à lutter contre l’antibiorésistance [Sciences et Avenir - Santé]

Des chercheurs britanniques ont découvert, dans la moisissure produite par une fourmi africaine, une souche efficace contre les bactéries résistantes.

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22 February 2017

Blood ties fuel cooperation among species, not survival instinct [Phys]

Cooperative breeding, when adults in a group team up to care for offspring, is not a survival strategy for animals living in extreme environments. It is instead a natural result of monogamous relationships reinforcing stronger genetic bonds in family groups. Siblings with full biological ties are more likely than others to stay with their family and help day to day, a new Oxford University study has found.

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