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Home > Communication > Scientific newsletter > Press articles > Science

Science Science feed

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4 March 2016

De nouvelles plantes "envahissantes" à l’échelle de l’Europe [Tela Botanica]

L’OEPP (Organisation européenne et méditerranéenne pour la protection des plantes) publie son premier numéro de l’année 2016. De nouvelles plantes sont signalées en Europe.
Dans son bulletin de janvier, le service d’information de l’OEPP mentionne de nouvelles plantes introduites sur le sol européen : Solanum elaeagnifolium, Arctotheca calendula, Manihot grahamii, Epilobium adenocaulon, Oenothera glazioviana.(...)

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4 March 2016

A new way to discover DNA modifications [Phys]

DNA is made from four nucleosides, each known by its own letter—A, G, C, and T. However, since the structure of DNA was deciphered in 1953, scientists have discovered several other variants that are often added to the DNA sequences to replace one of the usual four letters.

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29 February 2016

When sex roles get reversed, some females develop a ’penis’ [Phys]

In many species, the males develop elaborated sexual traits to attract females and dissuade potential rival males through competition. Some iconic examples are the extraordinary feathers of the peacock or paradise birds, or the menacing antlers of dominant red deer males.
But how is the role of each sex determined in nature? Why do males generally compete for access to females ?

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29 February 2016

Why Are These Male Fish Growing Eggs? [National Geographic]

Fish in wildlife refuges are feminized, probably by hormone-skewing pollution. What does this portend for the health of all creatures—and people ?

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29 February 2016

How plants protect photosynthesis from oxygen [Phys]

During the daytime, plants convert the Sun’s energy into sugars using photosynthesis, a complex, multi-stage biochemical process. New work from a team including Carnegie’s Mark Heinnickel, Wenqiang Yang, and Arthur Grossman identified a protein needed for assembling the photosynthetic apparatus that may help us understand the history of photosynthesis back in the early days of life on Earth, a time when oxygen was not abundant in the atmosphere. Their work is published by Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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