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27 October 2017

Why insects can develop from unfertilized egg cells [Phys]

A scientist from the Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Biology, has, together with his Russian colleague, has explained the frequent occurrence of parthenogenesis development of insects from unfertilized egg cells. Studying this phenomenon could contribute to controlling the species that cause damage to agriculture. The results were published in the Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research.

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27 October 2017

Lemur species losing favorite food to climate change, new study says [Mongabay]

Bamboo-eating lemurs in Madagascar could be slowly starving as a changing climate slashes the availability of their favorite part of the plant, a new study shows.

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27 October 2017

Genome Research Challenges Previous Understanding of the Origin of Photosynthesis [Berkeley Lab]

Plant biologists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), in collaboration with colleagues from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), have reconstructed the evolutionary history of photosynthesis to provide new insight into the yet-unfolding story of its origins.

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26 October 2017

Managing invasive species on islands can curb global extinction rates [IUCN]

Managing invasive species could benefit 95 per cent of Endangered and Critically Endangered amphibians, birds and mammals that live on islands, according to a study involving researchers from the IUCN Species Survival Commission (SSC) Invasive Species Specialist Group and IUCN Member Island Conservation, published today in the journal Science Advances.

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26 October 2017

New genes on "deteriorating" Y chromosome [Phys]

The Y chromosome, which is found only in males, is difficult to decode even with the latest sequencing technologies. Among evolutionary biologists, the question as to which genes lie on the male sex chromosome and where they came from is therefore hotly debated. Using an innovative analysis method, a team of population geneticists from Vetmeduni Vienna have now made a crucial breakthrough.(...)

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