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26 mai 2017

En direct des espèces : quelles sont les grenouilles présentées dans l’assiette ? [The Conversation]

Identifier le vivant est l’une des occupations majeures de l’être humain et peut-être peut-on le considérer comme une caractéristique du vivant : reconnaître son semblable, fuir devant ce qu’on sait être son ennemi, savoir ce que l’on peut manger. Illustration avec les grenouilles que l’on aime à déguster en France.

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26 mai 2017

Mountain honey bees have ancient adaptation for high-altitude foraging [Phys]

Mountain-dwelling East African honey bees have distinct genetic variations compared to their savannah relatives that likely help them to survive at high altitudes, report Martin Hasselmann of the University of Hohenheim, Germany, Matthew Webster of Uppsala University, Sweden, and colleagues May 25th, 2017, in PLOS Genetics.

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24 mai 2017

Birds, bees and other critters have scruples, and for good reason [Phys]

Humans are not the only species to show a strong work ethic and scruples. UC Berkeley researchers have found evidence of conscientiousness in insects, reptiles, birds, fish and other critters.
In reviewing nearly 4,000 animal behavior studies, UC Berkeley psychologists Mikel Delgado and Frank Sulloway tracked such attributes as industriousness, neatness, tenacity, cautiousness and self-discipline across a broad range of creatures great and small.

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24 mai 2017

La population de loups augmente en France [Le Monde - Biodiversité]

La population de canidés a atteint 360 individus contre 292 lors du dernier comptage publié en 2016 et compte 42 meutes contre 35 auparavant.

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24 mai 2017

Fast-Moving Biodiversity Assessment : Are We Already in the Future ? [Methods Blog]

Time flies… in the blink of an eye ! And even more so in science. The molecular lab work we were used to two decades ago seems like ancient history to today’s PhD students. The speed of change in sequencing technology is so overwhelming that imagination usually fails to foresee how our daily work will be in 10 years’ time. But in the field of biodiversity assessment, we have very good clues. Next Generation Sequencing is quickly becoming our workhorse for ambitious projects of species and genetic inventories.

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