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11 mai 2017

How dingoes could be shaping Australia’s landscape [Nature]

Dingoes can wreak havoc on Australia’s sheep population, so the canines have been fenced off from a large section of the country. But new research suggests that excluding dingoes can lead to a population boom in their preferred prey, kangaroos, that can change the plant composition of the landscape and even the soil chemistry. The finding is the latest addition in a long and contentious dispute about the effects of dingoes on Australia’s ecosystems.

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10 mai 2017

Seabirds use preening to decide how to divvy up parenting duties [ScienceNews]

Seabirds called common murres appear to use preening as a way to negotiate whose turn it is to watch their chick and who must find food. And when one parent is feeling foul, irregularities in this grooming ritual may send the other a signal that all is not well, researchers report in the July issue of The Auk : Ornithological Advances.

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10 mai 2017

Découverte de cinq nouvelles sous-espèces d’iguanes marins, dont un « Godzilla » [MNHN]

Charles Darwin, vraisemblablement herpétophobe, ne semblait guère apprécier les iguanes marins (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) les affublant du surnom peu flatteur de « lutins des ténèbres » (Imps of Darkness). Pourtant, ces animaux endémiques des îles Galapagos sont herbivores et le plus souvent inoffensifs.

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9 mai 2017

Tous les indicateurs du réchauffement climatique sont au rouge [Le Monde - Planète]

L’espoir de maintenir la hausse de la température moyenne sous la barre fatidique des 2°C s’éloigne de plus en plus.

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8 mai 2017

Birds choose their neighbours based on personality [Phys]

Birds of a feather nest together, according to a new study which has found that male great tits (Parus major) choose neighbours with similar personalities to their own.
Oxford University researchers investigated whether the personality of birds influences their social lives – in particular who they choose to nest near. The study involved analysing social network structure in a population of wild great tits at Wytham Woods, Oxfordshire, over six consecutive breeding seasons.

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